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Donahue & Horrow, LLP

Volunteers From Donahue & Horrow Join to Help Habitat for Humanity, Greater Los Angeles

Volunteers are the heart of Habitat for Humanity of Greater Los Angeles (Habitat LA) and each year, thousands of volunteers lend a hand to build and rehabilitate homes. We are proud to be able to take part in helping others and this year, volunteers from Donahue & Horrow helped Habitat LA ensure that homeowners in Los Angeles can live in safe, decent and affordable housing. It's hard, but rewarding work, and being part of a team that strives to improve the lives of others is what it's all about at Donahue & Horrow.

Butte Fire Insurance Coverage, Temporary Living Expenses

Many homeowner insurance policies cover additional living expenses during natural disasters. This covers living expenses for homeowners incurred as a result of damage caused by fire or mandatory evacuation, allowing consumers to focus their attention on recovery. The coverage typically includes food and housing costs, furniture rental, relocation and storage, and extra transportation expenses. Policy provisions, including deductibles, vary by company. Consumers should check with their insurer regarding any limitations that may apply to the coverage.

Cabral v. Ralphs – $4.8 Million Jury Verdict Reinstated

Adelelmo Cabral was driving home from work on the Eastbound I-10 freeway when he lost control of his car, crossed several lanes of traffic, and collided with the rear of a Ralph’s tractor-trailer rig that had been parked on the freeway shoulder, about 16-feet from the edge of the right lane. The area where the truck had been parked was marked by CalTrans with an “Emergency Parking Only” sign. The Ralph’s driver had stopped there to have a snack. He chose that specific area because it was shaded. Michael Horrow represented Mr. Cabral’s wife and children in a wrongful-death case against Ralph’s.

At trial, Mr. Horrow obtained a jury verdict in favor of the Cabral family, which found that the Ralph’s driver had been negligent in parking his truck adjacent to the freeway, and he also persuaded the trial court to deny Ralph’s motion for judgment notwithstanding the verdict. On appeal, however, the Court of Appeal reversed the judgment in favor of the Cabral family, finding that Ralphs could not be held liable because its driver owed no duty of care to passing motorists with respect to where he parked his truck alongside the freeway.

The California Supreme Court agreed to hear the case, and reversed the Court of Appeal, reinstating the jury verdict.

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